Helping Fathers Modify Existing Family Law Orders

The courts understand that financial and social circumstances change in people's lives. If you are the noncustodial parent of a child and can no longer meet the original terms of your custody, visitation and child support order, you have the right to pursue a modification through the courts.

DO NOT TRY TO WORK OUT AN INFORMAL ARRANGEMENT WITH THE CUSTODIAL PARENT. It is critically important to have the courts officially modify your court order. Informal agreements typically work for awhile, but often fall apart. You will not have a legal leg to stand on if the custodial parent backs out of the agreement.

Modifications can be made for a number of reasons, including:

  • Loss of job
  • The custodial parent's financial needs for day care expenses change
  • The mother's moving out of the immediate geographic area with the child
  • New job requiring significant change in commute or long-distance travel
  • Change in work shift
  • Deployment for military service
  • Teenage child requests change because of social schedule

Changed Circumstances And The Rights Of Fathers

Most fathers understand that their infant child needs to spend the majority of time with their mother. Court parenting schedules often reflect an imbalance in the time a father gets to spend with the child. As the child becomes a toddler, however, the father has a right to expand the amount of parenting time. If you feel your child is at the age when he or she will benefit from additional time with dad, it is time to discuss modifying your original court order.

Contact

If you need to discuss an enforcement issue with an attorney or need to change your original court order, it is important to work through the courts. That starts by hiring an experienced Georgia fathers' rights lawyer. To reach Marsh & Frost, at our Marietta office, call 678-383-4953 or toll free at 866-920-4494. You can also send an email explaining your circumstances.